Winner of

  • The Christopher Award

  • 2017 Flora Stieglitz Straus Award by the Children’s Book Committee at Bank Street College of Education

  • EUREKA!  Nonfiction Gold Award (CA)

  • Center for the Study of Multicultural Children’s Literature Best Multicultural Books List

  • NCTE Orbis Pictus Recommended Book

  • New York Public Library Best Books for Kids

  • 2017 Green Earth Book Award Short List

  • Texas Bluebonnet 2017-18 Master List

  • Junior Library Guild Spring 2016 Selection

  • 2017-18 Black Eyed Susan Nominee

  • ILA Notable Books for a Global Society

  • ALA Notables nomination list

  • GoodReads Popular Mock Caldecott 2017

  • BooksNational Education Association Read Across America Resource Calendar
     

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL –Luann Toth
"Comport’s mixed-media collages are nothing short of brilliant as she plays with light and dark throughout. The spreads capture the look and feel of the cramped and stinking landfill, the oppressive heat, and the hardscrabble lives of the residents. They also convey the resourcefulness and warmth of the families and the aspirations of the children. The scenes of the kids embracing their instruments and sharing their joy at making music are absolutely transcendent. 'With her violin, Ada could close her eyes and imagine a different life. She could soar on the high, bright, bittersweet notes to a place far away. She could be who she was meant to be.' ” 
VERDICT A virtuoso piece of nonfiction, gloriously told and illustrated.

BOOKLIST
"The mixed-media collages are a particular effective medium for this true story, layering images of Ada and the orchestra over the landfill. The nuances of the subject may strike a stronger chord with adults rather than children, but the interesting visuals and the underlying message of hope and perseverance should help this find an audience." 

KIRKUS REVIEWS
"Comport's complex, digitally enhanced collages combine acrylics, drawing, and layered typographic elements, conveying both the oppressive omnipresence of garbage and the functional beauty of the handcrafted instruments. . . . Pair with the suggested video links to experience the music of a remarkable, resilient cultural community."

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, STARRED REVIEW
Hood’s (Rooting for You) beautifully narrated true tale begins in Cateura, a “noisy, stinking, sweltering slum” of Paraguay. That’s where Ada Ríos lives with her family, recyclers (gancheros) who collect and sell trash from the nearby landfill. When engineer Favio Chávez begins teaching music to at-risk children there, Ada learns the violin, and she and other students play instruments made from recycled trash. Comport (Love Will See You Through) employs a vibrant collage technique, using pictures of food labels, tires, and other detritus to form colorful, almost ethereal backdrops. Light-infused scenes of gancheros picking through mountains of trash, children playing soccer in Cateura’s streets, and Ada practicing violin all include hopeful shades of yellow. Torn bits of a musical score edge out the garbage scraps as the story progresses. When the Recycled Orchestra gains fame, its members perform in some of the world’s biggest, brightest cities: “Buried in the trash was music. And buried in themselves was something to be proud of.” An author’s note expands on this uplifting, instructive story; a Spanish-language edition is available simultaneously.

SCHOOL LIBRARY CONNECTION
The illustrations, compilations of torn paper, paint, and pen and ink illustrations, add to the feeling of being within the landfill, and are a beautiful representation of the location...Highly Recommended.


Love Will See You Through: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Six Guiding Beliefs (As Told by His Niece)

WINNER OF THE BANK STREET BEST CHILDREN'S BOOK OF THE YEAR

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

The bold, colorful mixed-media illustrations capture the emotion of the situations described, and Watkins’s writing style is conversational but impassioned.

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY
Watkins again uses events in King’s life...to illustrate his dedication to acting on his convictions. Comport (Hanging Off Jefferson’s Nose) features intense shades of orange, fuchsia, and purple in her energetic mixed-media art, which incorporates imposing display type and occasional newspaper excerpts illuminating the turbulence of the time. Especially striking are her conspicuous portraits of hands: raised in protest, folded in prayer, and linked in solidarity.

BOOKLIST
The picture-book format features compelling, expressive artwork. King’s guiding beliefs spill across the pages in bold, oversize font, accompanied by detailed illustrations in rich, somber hues.


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